Titanic passenger facts and figures

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The Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank on its maiden voyage on April 15, 1912. The Titanic was meant to be an unsinkable ship but after hitting an iceberg in the North Atlantic Ocean it started to sink. It was also the largest and most luxurious ship of its time. She was carrying over 2,200 passengers and crew members, many of whom were wealthy and influential individuals. What do we know about the Titanic’s passengers on that doomed ship?

This is everything you need to know about the Titanic passengers and Survivors in Facts and Figures.

Everything You Need to Know About Titanic Passengers and Survivors in Facts and Figures

How many passengers were on the Titanic’s maiden voyage?

The exact number of those travelling on the Titanic is not known but the Titanic had a capacity of 3,547 people (passengers and crew combined. It was not fully occupied on its voyage from Southampton to New York City. From the passenger lists the official total of all passengers was a total of 1317. 

  • First Class 324
  • Second Class 284 (including 8 bandsmen)
  • Third Class 709
  • 524 were women and children.

Where did the Titanic depart and who was onboard at the time?

The Titanic departed from Southampton, England on April 10, 1912. The ship made stops in Cherbourg, France and Queenstown (now known as Cobh), Ireland before heading towards its final destination of New York City. On the night of April 14, 1912, the passenger liner was carrying a total of 2,224 people on board. Of those, 1,317 were passengers and 907 were crew members.

What happened to the Titanic?

The Titanic passenger ship hit an iceberg at around 11:40 PM, causing extensive damage to the ship’s hull and leading to a loss of power and communication systems.

Despite efforts to evacuate the passengers and crew onto the lifeboats, there were not enough lifeboats to accommodate all of the people on board. Many of the lifeboats were not fully loaded. The evacuation process was also hindered by the lack of organization and communication, as well as the difficulty of navigating the dark and freezing conditions.

The Titanic eventually sank at around 2:20 AM on April 15, 1912, with more than 1,500 people losing their lives in the disaster. The survivors were rescued by nearby ships that responded to the Titanic’s distress calls, including the RMS Carpathia, which arrived about two hours after the Titanic sank.

The sinking of the Titanic was a major tragedy that shocked the world and raised awareness about the importance of safety measures and regulations for maritime travel. The disaster also led to significant changes in the shipping industry, including the establishment of the International Ice Patrol and the development of new safety regulations and equipment for ships. Including a lifeboat drill being made mandatory.

Titanic Life boat photo

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How many dogs were on the Titanic?

It is believed that there were at least 12 dogs on board the Titanic, although the exact number is not known for certain. The dogs belonged to various passengers, and some were brought on board as pets. Other animals and dogs were transported as cargo. The Titanic did not have any designated kennel areas, so the dogs were kept in their owners’ cabins or in other areas of the ship. Unfortunately, most of the dogs did not survive the sinking of the Titanic. A few dogs were rescued along with their owners.

How many people died on the Titanic?

There were a total of 1,517 victims of the Titanic disaster who died in the sinking on April 15, 1912. This includes passengers and crew members and represents about two-thirds of the people on board the ship. The majority of the deaths were due to drowning or hypothermia. Many of the lifeboats were not fully loaded and there were not enough to accommodate all of the passengers and crew. There were 705 survivors who were rescued by nearby ships that responded to the Titanic’s distress calls.

How many survivors were there on the Titanic?

A total of 705 people survived the sinking of the Titanic on April 15, 1912. Of those survivors, 325 were passengers and 380 were crew members. The survivors were rescued by nearby ships that responded to the Titanic’s distress calls, including the RMS Carpathia, which arrived about two hours after the Titanic sank. The survivors were mostly women and children, as they were given priority to board the lifeboats, although there were also some men who survived. The survival rate for the passengers and crew was approximately 32%, which means that about two-thirds of the people on board the Titanic did not survive.

Of those who survived the Titanic, how many were first-class passengers?

Of the 705 survivors of the Titanic, 203 were first-class passengers. This represents about 40% of the total number of first class passengers on board the ship. The majority of the survivors were women and children, as they were given priority to board the lifeboats. In fact, all but two of the first class children on board the Titanic survived, while many of the third-class passengers did not. The survival rates also varied based on gender and class, with women and children having higher survival rates than men. The first-class passengers also had higher survival rates than the third class passengers. All of the first class luggage was lost containing thousands of pounds worth of valuables along with people’s beloved pets.

Original Passenger list of first class passengers approved by white star line 1912

Of those who survived the Titanic how many were second-class passengers?

Of the 705 survivors of the Titanic, 118 were second-class passengers. This represents about 25% of the total number of second-class passengers on board the ship. The majority of the survivors were women and children, as they were given priority to board the lifeboats. In fact, all of the second-class children on board the Titanic survived, while many of the third-class passengers did not.

Original List of Titanic Passengers travelling in second class as received by cable from White Star Line
Original List of Titanic Passengers travelling in second class as received by cable from White Star Line

Of those who survived the Titanic how many were third class passengers?

Of the 705 survivors of the Titanic, 181 were third-class passengers in steerage. This represents about 23% of the total number of third-class passengers on board the ship. The majority of the survivors were women and children, as they were given priority to board the lifeboats. However, the third class passengers had lower survival rates than the first and second-class passengers, and many of them were not able to access the lifeboats due to their location on the ship and language barriers.

What was Steerage on the Titanic?

The Titanic, like many ocean liners of the early 20th century, had accommodations for steerage passengers. There were more than 700 steerage passengers aboard the Titanic when it sank in 1912.

The steerage section of the Titanic was located on the lower decks and was separated from the more luxurious accommodations for first and second-class passengers. Steerage passengers had basic amenities, such as communal bathrooms and dining areas, and slept in bunk beds in large open dormitories.

The conditions in steerage were crowded and uncomfortable, but they were considered an improvement over the conditions on earlier ships. Despite the difficult conditions, many steerage passengers aboard the Titanic were determined to start a new life in America and had saved for years to afford the fare for the voyage.

When the Titanic hit an iceberg and sank in the North Atlantic, many steerage passengers were unable to reach the lifeboats in time and perished in the frigid waters. The loss of life was particularly high among steerage passengers, as they were located on the lower decks. They had a harder time making their way up to the lifeboats.

How many animals were onboard the Titanic 

It is estimated that there were a few dozen animals on board the Titanic, although the exact number is not known for certain. The animals included dogs, cats, chickens, and birds, as well as exotic animals such as a lion cub and a marmoset monkey. Many of the animals belonged to first-class passengers and were brought on board as pets. Some animals were being transported as cargo. Unfortunately, most of the animals did not survive the sinking of the Titanic. There were no provisions or plans in place to rescue or evacuate them. The protocol was women and children first.

Who was the wealthiest passenger on the Titanic

The wealthiest passenger on the Titanic was John Jacob Astor IV. John was an American business magnate, real estate developer, investor, inventor, writer, a lieutenant colonel in the Spanish-American War, and also a prominent member of the Astor family. His estimated net worth at the time was around $87 million. The equivalent to about $2.3 billion in today’s currency. Astor was travelling on the Titanic with his young wife, Madeleine, who was pregnant with their child. Unfortunately, both perished in the disaster.

Third class passenger Jacob Alfred Johansson

Jacob Alfred Johansson was a third-class passenger aboard the RMS Titanic during its maiden voyage in 1912. He was a 29-year-old Swedish labourer who was travelling to America in search of better employment opportunities. Johansson boarded the Titanic at Southampton, England, on April 10, 1912, as a third-class passenger in steerage. He wrote a diary whilst onboard and it is included in the Titanic exhibition.

On the night of April 14, 1912, the Titanic struck an iceberg and began to sink. Johansson managed to escape the sinking ship by jumping into the icy waters of the North Atlantic and swimming to one of the lifeboats that had been launched from the ship. He was one of the lucky few third-class passengers who managed to survive the disaster, and he was eventually rescued by the RMS Carpathia.

Johansson later settled in the United States and lived in the state of Michigan. He passed away on October 3, 1963, at the age of 80.

Who were the last Titanic survivors

The last Titanic survivor was Millvina Dean, who passed away on May 31, 2009, at the age of 97. She was the youngest passenger on the Titanic and was just two months old when the ship sank.

Before Millvina’s death, the last living survivor who had actual memories of the Titanic sinking was Barbara Joyce West Dainton. She was born on May 24, 1911, in Bournemouth, England, and was just over a year old when she and her family boarded the Titanic as second-class passengers. Barbara and her mother were rescued in Lifeboat 12, while her father did not survive the disaster. Barbara passed away on October 16, 2007, at the age of 96.

There were a few other people who were born before the Titanic sinking but were too young to remember it, and they lived into their 100s. These included Lillian Gertrud Asplund, who passed away in 2006 at the age of 99, and Winnifred Vera Quick, who passed away in 2002 at the age of 97.

Who was the captain of the Titanic?

Captain Edward John Smith (27 January 1850 – 15 April 1912) was a British naval officer and ship captain, best known for his role as captain of the RMS Titanic. Smith began his seafaring career as a teenager and worked his way up the ranks to become a captain in the British Merchant Navy.

Smith was appointed as the captain of the Titanic, a brand-new and luxurious ocean liner, in 1912, on the ship’s maiden voyage. Despite being widely blamed for the disaster, Smith was highly regarded as a skilled and experienced captain prior to the Titanic’s sinking. He had previously commanded several other ships, including the RMS Olympic and the RMS Adriatic.

Smith was born in Hanley, Staffordshire, England, and was the son of a potter. He was married and had a daughter. Smith’s death on the Titanic is often seen as a symbol of the tragedy of the ship’s sinking, and his legacy is still discussed and debated to this day.

Some Titanic Passenger Stories

Millvina Dean

Millvina Dean was the youngest passenger on the Titanic and the last survivor of the disaster. She was born on February 2, 1912, in London, England. She was just two months old when she boarded the Titanic with her parents, Bertram Frank Dean and Georgetta Eva Light. They were emigrating to the United States, where her father hoped to open a tobacco shop.

On the fateful night of the Titanic disaster, Millvina and her mother were placed in Lifeboat number 10. Her father perished in the sinking. Millvina and her mother were rescued by the RMS Carpathia and taken to New York City.

Millvina lived a long life and became a notable figure in the Titanic community. She passed away on May 31, 2009, at the age of 97.

Miss Margaret Hays

Miss Margaret Hays was a passenger on the Titanic who boarded the ship in Southampton, England, on April 10, 1912. She was a 24-year-old Scottish woman who was traveling in second class with her mother, Mrs. Charles Hays.

According to some reports, Miss Hays was on her way to the United States to marry her fiancé, a man named Philip Mock, who was waiting for her in New York. She was traveling with her mother, who had been visiting family in Scotland and was returning home to Montreal, Canada, with her daughter.

During the night of April 14, 1912, the Titanic struck an iceberg and began to sink. Miss Hays and her mother were among the passengers who were forced to evacuate the ship. They were able to secure a spot in one of the lifeboats, but Mrs Hays tragically did not survive the disaster. Miss Hays, however, survived and was later rescued by the Carpathia.

After being rescued, Miss Hays continued her journey to New York, where she was met by her fiancé, Philip Mock. The couple married soon after and settled in Ottawa, Canada, where they lived for the rest of their lives.

Who was unsinkable Molly Brown, a passenger on the Titanic?

Molly Brown, also known as Margaret Brown, was an American socialite, philanthropist, and activist who lived from 1867 to 1932. She is perhaps best known for her heroic efforts during the sinking of the RMS Titanic in 1912, which earned her the nickname “The Unsinkable Molly Brown.”

Molly Brown was born in Hannibal, Missouri, and grew up in a family of modest means. She moved to Leadville, Colorado, in 1886 after marrying J.J. Brown, a mining engineer who had struck it rich. Brown quickly became a prominent member of Leadville society, known for her charm, wit, and charitable works.

After the sinking of the Titanic, Brown became known for her bravery and leadership . She helped to organize the lifeboats and care for the survivors. She also helped to raise funds for the families of those who had died in the disaster.

In addition to her work on behalf of Titanic survivors, Brown was also a strong advocate for women’s suffrage and workers’ rights. She ran for political office several times and worked to improve conditions for miners and their families.

Despite her many accomplishments, Brown was often caricatured in the press as a loud, brash, and unsophisticated woman. However, in recent years, she has been recognized for her important contributions to social and political causes. As well as her bravery and leadership during one of the most tragic events in modern history.

J. Bruce Ismay

J. Bruce Ismay was the chairman and managing director of the White Star Line, the company that owned the Titanic. He was born on December 12, 1862, in Crosby, England.

On the night of the Titanic’s sinking, Ismay was a passenger on the ship. After the collision with the iceberg, he worked with the crew to load the lifeboats and helped passengers into them. He eventually boarded Lifeboat 1. Lifeboat 1 was one of the first lifeboats to be launched and was rescued by the RMS Carpathia.

Ismay’s actions after the sinking were controversial, as some accused him of abandoning the ship while others argued that he had acted appropriately. Ismay testified at both the British and American inquiries into the sinking and his reputation was tarnished by the public scrutiny. Ismay retired from the White Star Line in 1913, and he spent much of the rest of his life in seclusion. He died on October 17, 1937, at the age of 74.

Eva Hart

Eva Hart was a survivor of the Titanic disaster and a prominent speaker on the topic of the sinking. She was born on January 31, 1905, in Ilford, Essex, England, and was seven years old at the time of the Titanic’s sinking.

Eva was travelling on the Titanic with her parents, Benjamin and Esther Hart, who were emigrating to Winnipeg, Canada. On the night of the sinking, Eva and her mother were placed in Lifeboat 14 and were rescued by the RMS Carpathia. Sadly, Eva’s father did not survive the disaster.

After the sinking, Eva and her mother returned to England and settled in Chadwell Heath, where Eva became a schoolteacher. She later married and had children of her own. In her later years, Eva became a popular speaker on the Titanic disaster and was often interviewed by the media. Eva Hart passed away on February 14, 1996, at the age of 91.

Charlotte Wardle Cardeza 

Charlotte Wardle Cardeza also known as Charlotte Drake Martinez Cardeza was a First class passenger who survived the sinking of the Titanic. Later on, she went on to file this claim for her lost property. As part of the claim, she also included a list of the items she brought aboard with her.

Charlotte Cardeza had a first class top suite on deck B of the Titanic’s maiden voyage. Her suite was the largest suite of rooms on the Titanic and the ticket and door number was no B-51/53/55. Her ticket number 17755 cost her £512, 6s.

Titanic Charlotte Wardle Cardeza

Charlotte married James Warburton Martinez Cardeza in 1874 and lived in a mansion in Montebello, Germantown, Pennsylvania. She boarded the Titanic at Cherbourg with her son Thomas and her maid Anna Ward.

Charlotte shopped at only the best boutiques in Europe. She purchased her jewellery in places such as Tiffany’s of London and her clothes from the top Parisian boutiques. Charlotte owned only the finest gowns and dresses, which were made of exquisite silks. Her dresses were made with crepes, satins and the finest laces. The dresses were embellished with beads, appliqués and often hand embroidered. They were in beautiful colours such as baby blue and coral, perfect for all the parties and gala nights onboard the Titanic.

Charlotte was well known for filing a claim for her luggage or her return.

Five more lives were claimed by the Titan Sub

Sadly the Titanic claimed more lives when the Titan Submarine looking for the Titanic remains suffered an implosion killing all five people on board.

US authorities verified the disappearance of the submersible Titan run by OceanGate, which vanished while diving to the wreckage of the Titanic on Friday the 16th of June 2023. The tragic incident resulted in the instantaneous death of all five crew members due to a “catastrophic implosion,” a violent collapse inward.

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  • Donna Vallance

    Donna loves cruising with her husband and two teenage boys. Having cruised with the children from a young age she feels it is the perfect way to experience the world safely. Her boys are social butterfly’s and love meeting other children their own age whilst onboard some of the most extraordinary floating ships. She also writes over at Like Love Do, a travel memoir of her trips, from London to far off beaches. She has an eye for the unusual and like to go off of the beaten track just to find the perfect photo. With a passion for photography and exploring cruising has become the perfect holiday choice.

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